My Darling Clementine (1946) Revisited


My Darling Clementine (1946)I remember seeing My Darling Clementine (1946) very early on when I started to watch all these classic films which now inform my work. I wasn’t aware at all of what this film was really about. Seeing a man come into town taking the marshals job to ensure that he could seek out revenge for his brothers murder. It’s only with the passing of time, and seeing more film adaptations of the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral that I can see a lineage going on here, as new information is found new films are made. Different directors give their spin to the events, John Sturges gave us two interpretations Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) and The Hour of the Gun (1957) which expanded vasty on the events that we all know of. Here however in the events are told from the true perspective of Wyatt Earp who once met John Ford who’s version stands heads above the others I have seen, telling him how the shoot-out actually happened, making the audience wait until the end.

The build up is really non-existent as we drift from scene to scene, even over the short running time of the film, a lot actually takes places, from the very start we are introduced to the Earp brothers who are not as we expect them, out in the open country with cattle it feels out of place, yet strangely not, they just are. We are introduced to the Clanton’s lead by Walter Brennan who fitted easily from role good to bad guy with ease. Whilst Henry Fonda personifies the up standing Marshall Wyatt Earp who reluctantly takes on his old job in Tombstone to give him licence to avenge his brother James’s death. His remaining brothers follow.

Tombstone is not the classic boom-town that we know from later films, located once more in Monument Valley a location that becomes John Ford country in years to come. Photographed as a mythical land where these events take place, creating instead a small town in the middle of nowhere, far away from civilisation which is creeping up on the people of the town. Lit as a classic film and heavy lighting you could easily mistake it for a film-noir or one of Ford’s earlier films such as The Informer (1935) in the streets of Ireland. The lack of music is eerie at times, whilst other times you hardly notice it, swept away by the people who inhabit this small town.

The main characters of course are all there, from Doc Holliday (Victor Mature) taking on a more adversarial role, competing to enforce the law, whilst still suffering from tuberculosis. All of the Earp and Clanton brothers are present, with the addition of two women who create tension for the two lead men as they try and see eye to eye. Is this the truth or just a Fordian touch to the legend?

It’s classic Ford at his best, writing his own passages of American legend that easily tips into fiction into facts with a sense of grandeur with the lightest of touches. We can see a love for the open country and the people who helped shape it. Defined here by the stars of the day who were seen as god like figures who graced the screens. With breathtaking scenery and by chance shots of the sky that encapsulate everything that Ford is known for. This is what I missed the first time around with this film, all the little touches from the first shot of Earp/Fonda from below, a historical figure and hero of a not so distant past. Complete with the homely touches of the Ford Stock Company who becoming like a travelling band of actors who bring to life the ideas and visions of Ford. I love the director more now than I did a day ago.

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4 responses

  1. One of the most important Westerns ever made – in moving the genre from B Pulp to being recognized as legitimate theatre.

    July 14, 2014 at 6:43 pm

    • Agreed, the pulpy westerns of the 30s and pre war became something to be admired, loved and respected. Thanks for the comment.

      July 15, 2014 at 11:00 am

  2. Reblogged this on My Favorite Westerns and commented:
    One of the most important Westerns ever made – in raising the Western genre from B Pulp to legitimate theatre.

    July 14, 2014 at 6:45 pm

  3. More than legitimate theatre really – to Art. Nearly every shot is crafted – framed – composed. Nobody else who made Westerns (that I know of) in that era created such graphic shots – Artwork.
    As us stated by others, It’s surely possible that Ford was influenced by German film makers – and others – of that time, who were doing some great and innovative work, to raise the artistic quality of the genre. Even the famous bar scene that references to Shakespeare seems intended to jolt the bland consciousness of most American film making at that time – toward a more refined depth – by it’s contrast.
    There is so much in there – and so much that I miss – in not being around at that time.
    Yep … there’s a lot more in that corral than a bunch of hoodlums with guns.

    August 6, 2014 at 3:12 pm

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