The Train (1964)


The Train (1964)This is the kind of film you want when you think of The Monuments Men (2014) which also wants to save priceless art falling into Nazi hands. Something which The Train (1964) does better in spades. Focused on the journey of one train load of paintings by artists we know today as the masters of modern art we know today. Their skill and talent was known even before the out-break of war. A time in Germany which saw book burnings, modern art of both German and international artists branded as degenerate. Raided from collectors both, especially Jews who had worse to suffer under the regime. Being archived and exhibited as degenerate art of lower races, something to be-despised by German people.

Once France was under occupation, sways of more art was taken away, the countries pride and glory, something that has been left in their care. If these are lost they cannot be recovered, or remade. Not like the cuisine or output of the culture. To loose these would be a crime that a nation would be ashamed of for a generation.

Enter a member of the Resistance who cares little about a collection of art which is being transported over to Germany. He has no real appreciation for the works, however the idea that a part of France can so easily be lost is something he cannot let happen. Train station master Labiche (Burt Lancaster) who is persuaded by gallery archivist whose passion for the works that are bout transported out he is soon persuaded with his small resistance group.

It’s essentially a game of cat and mouse between the resistance and Colonel Von Waldheim (Paul Scofield) an officer who by definition should detest theses works that drive him mad with passion. The journey into Germany blinds him to the point of distraction as time after time sabotage and good old fashioned foolery proceed in the film. When you think about it, France had been under occupation for almost 5 years by the time these events take place, when their culture is at stake they rise to the challenge once.

Centred around a single train engine for most of the film, the camera takes in the beautiful piece of engineering history from every angle possible as this game of wits plays out. Its tense yet fun to see the Nazi fooled time and again. With more love for the trains as they are used like weapons at times to de-rail (literally) the plans of one journey that should never make its destination.

What makes this film is that the real passion for the work lies with the enemy, who by default would want it destroyed, unless it was heading for the proposed museum in Germany. Whilst a Frenchman whose culture is a stake has no real interest in the works, he knows nothing of they’re worth financially or critically. He is instead driven by a passion for his country, its one step too far. Instead of banging on about a culture being lost as I have seen in The Monuments Men these people are actually putting their lives on the line, not talking about it. Yes they did meet a few, but they didn’t go half as far, maybe they should have joined the resistance. Thats not to do deserve to the real monuments men who saved a lot of work falling into enemy hands and disappearing off the face of the Earth. We are still discovering works by the old masters which were taken from Jewish collections. Why didn’t George Clooney and his boys take a leaf out of Lancaster’s book? 

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2 responses

  1. The Train – a Classic. John Frankenheimer and Arthur Penn directing.

    Most everybody seemed disappointed in Monuments Men – somewhat flat. Too bad.

    November 24, 2014 at 8:06 pm

    • Yeah the more I think about Monuments men it was like you say..flat.

      I wish I saw The Train earlier to be honest its one to watch at christmas

      November 24, 2014 at 8:56 pm

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