Archive for February, 2017

Moonlight (2016)


moonlight-2016There’s a reason why Moonlight (2016) won last night at the Oscars, even after the result was fudged up by Faye Dunaway and her old pal Warren Beatty did their best during the biggest blunder of the ceremonies 89 year history. Even before the result was corrected on the stage that saw the award go to La La Land (2016) I knew in my heart that it should have gone to admittedly the stronger of the two films – Moonlight. I’d like to use this as my argument for why it should and rightly so have been awarded Best Picture.

At first I wasn’t really fussed by seeing the film, know it was something special. It took reading and listening reviews for me to change my mind and check it out. A 3 act film that follows one Black guy from child to manhood, not so different on the surface they have been urban films before, but none that tackle homosexuality and so sensitively too. A social urban film that doesn’t play up to the stereotypes of African-Americans for a white audiences. Its story is ultimately human which has allowed it to transcend the barrier of colour. The humanity in La La Land’s restricted within the confines of a couple who are striving for their own dreams. Far more selfish than most those in Moonlight. Maybe it’s that we follow Chiron played by three different actors allowing us to spend so much time with him, it’s far more intimate.

La La Land is essentially a love letter to Hollywood by the machine that produced it, a musical that loves musicals. Now there’s nothing wrong with that, however it feels constructed with the intent to win votes for last night. I know that’s not the case, with a release and campaign doing that job for the film. With Moonlight the love is for the a hard-won emotion that Chiron who begins his journey with us under 10 as Little (Alex R. Hibbert) a cute and shy kid who has far more on his mind than most kids. Picked on for being different, but why is he different, at his tender age he begins to look in on himself to consider he maybe gay. Supported ironically by drug lord come mentor Juan (Mahershala Ali) (who rightly won best supporting) who is the cause of Little’s mum Paula’s addiction. Herself played by a dazzling Naomie Harris who filmed her scenes in 3 days in between promotion for the latest Bond film.

You feel nothing but sympathy for Little’s struggle on the street, at school, at home and with his own identity. Finding strength in his young friend Kevin (Jaden Piner) who we follow also throughout Chiron’s life. All you want to do is reach into the screen and hug the little man who has so much to deal with and nowhere to turn. Juan is the only father figure in his life, who is not wanted by Paula as we later learn.

Moving onto high-school and we meet Black (Trevante Rhodes) the teenage Chiron whose grown slightly in confidence, yet still painfully shy. Still friends with Kevin (Jharrel Jerome) who will play a pivotal role in Black’s sexuality and future. As we have seen before in film, high-schools harsh world for some, filled with social pressures to conform as you leave childhood to become adult. You really get a sense of the angst that has been building up before it explodes after a fight on the playground that pits friends against each other. It’s nothing short of being a painful watch for the audience. In a way you see it coming, all the pent-up rage being unleashed after a moment of tenderness’s matched with one of betrayal before violence follows.

The final act sees an incredible transformation for Chiron (Ashton Sanders) who is now a drug dealer, beefed up and wearing bling to suit the life he has fallen into. On the surface it gives him power and confidence on the streets, no one questions him, the fear he can incite into those below him. It takes a few minutes to realise this is the same guy who we saw only moments ago. We are also bang-up-to-date in terms of period. La La Land does have a character transformation with that clever and controversial twist. Here in Streets of Atlanta, Georgia you could say Chiron has come full circle, taking on the role of his once father figure who took him under his wing. Yet its all a facade that takes one phone call and two visits to his mother and Kevin.

The last third sees everything come to a close, making sense of what has just happened, he’s come so far yet has not developed emotionally to have a romantic relationship, too insecure, too damaged by his past and his position prevents him from being truly happy. Very different to Seb (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) who made personal sacrifices to fulfill the creative ambitions, their dreams come true at great cost to each other. In Miami and Georgia reality is against Chiron, his economic, family, social and sexual background are not in his favor. Its a much richer, human drama that wipes the floor with La La Land, which is a completely different film.

Now does this show a change in Oscar voting and ultimately American films, or is it simply a fluke that 3 Black films had prominent nominations in multiple catergories. For me, its a good start to see a much more varied mix of films to enjoy and celebrate, different stories to tell and share with audiences. It’s really too early to tell if this progress is here to stay or just simply lip service, lets hope this year sees more progress, more diversity whilst still exciting stories to


Painting the Town… Update (25/2/17)


It was a rather quick day in the studio. I’ve been adding a few more details to the remaining models whilst I finally got the paint out and made a start on priming them all. Just as I was finishing I realised that I missed off the cross on my church piece. It’s a very minor detail which i will consider adding or not as I don’t want it to delayed the next test.

Next time I’ll be going into full painting mode. I’m hoping to undertaking another test later next month or early April.


Film Talk – The 1960’s Dream – Part 2


After showing a portion of A Kind of Loving (1962) I moved onto Midnight Cowboy (1969)that was John Schlesinger‘s last film of the decade. It was the first X rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars, and another two, Best Director and best-adapted screenplay.

On the surface it doesn’t share the same themes of the earlier film if anything it’s a more personal piece by Schlesinger a successful homosexual director bringing these themes to the film. It follows Joe Buck (Jon Voight) a young Texan who decides to move to New York to try his luck in his own words as a Hustler, believing his authentic cowboy image is going to attract all the women. Unaware of the images true connotations. It’s not until he gets there and is befriended by Ratso Dustin Hoffman does he slowly begin to realize what is happening. The dream of success on the streets is shattered much like that of the sexual and cultural revolution of the 1960’s. I noticed that financially he’s always paying out and not earning in return for his “work”, things slowly get worse for him. Midnight Cowboy can be seen as the culmination of the 1960’s the pill has long been in use, allowing for more promiscuity and sexual freedom. We are seeing the results over in the States. I’d like to share a few scenes from both films back to back to show the similarities between them.

The first is the Father son chat about the future – A Kind of Loving, and Joe properly meeting Ratso – Midnight Cowboy. (Stills below)

Both Vic and Joe have ideas of what their dreams are, Vic is not so sure about how he is to achieve them, even when his dad has allowed him the freedom to pursue them. Where as Joe is more optimistic

The second we find our characters on coaches; Vic and Ingrid (June Ritchie) on the Coach – A Kind of Loving and Joe on the Coach to New York – Midnight Cowboy (Stills below)

All are starting out on new directions, the honey moon couple who as we see are de-flowered twice in a few minutes, once on the coach as they take the flowers from the button holes, and sexually. Whilst Joe is going to live out his American dream.

The third we see both Vic and Joe in arguments, Again we see Mrs. Rothwell (Thora Hird), Ingrid’s Mum giving Vic her honest opinion. And Ratso telling Joe how it is regarding his Cowboy image. (stills below)

The dreamers are being attacked.

The final two comparisons I will look at emotions at the train station and the homes that both Vic and Joe live in, which will be in the final part 3

 


20th Century Women (2016)


20th-women-2016I’m in the middle of 3 days at the cinema, I’ve just come back from an all guns blazing The LEGO Batman Movie (2017) which is as clever and fun as Deadpool (2016) however I don’t want to discuss those film which I really enjoyed. Instead I want to look at a more adult film which I caught last night 20th Century Women (2016) which I came away from feeling chilled and somehow feeling reassured if only for a short time. Coming from Mike Mills previous film Beginners (2010) which I recently learned was the directors fictional account of discovering his father (Christopher Plummer) was gay, that’s after a long absence in his life. It was a similar experience, allowing you to process the imagery differently from the average film, it had an more like a piece of video art with Plummer and Ewan McGregor as Miles. I’m struggling to really define what it was beyond being light, thought-provoking and fun.

I can see the director gets his best material from his own past, this time turning to his mother Dorothea whose played by Annette Bening, who through narration of the characters we build up their personal history, talking directly to the audience, like an open diary that takes a loose documentary. First meeting Dorothea herself who was born during the depression, its 1979 and she’s now 55 years old, a lot has changed during her life already. We get a brief life story to this point, she’s a single mother who starts to doubt her own parenting on only son Jame (Lucas Jade Zumann) aka Mike, with no father in his life how will he grow up to be a fully formed young man. I guess all parents wonder how they are to mold their children especially as they enter puberty. It’s the last chance they can try to leave their mark on them before they make their own way in life.

Living in a house under renovation we see handy man William (Billy Crudup) a mechanic whose helping restore the house after years of neglect and a history that Dorothea doesn’t want to see repeated before the century draws to a close. She comes to the film with a wealth of life experience and the vulnerabilities that come as her emotional baggage. She’s open to what’s going on around, a sense of humor that lets her explore, yet still a woman from another time trying to make sense if this time. Which we see in stills that illustrates the close of the Seventies, punk is dying and Reagan is about to become President, times indeed are changing for everyone.

With such a small cast we have time to explore everyone of them in great detail. From the perfectly cast Bening who has reached a point in her parenting when she feels she needs help from her photographer lodger Abie (Greta Gerwig) who we learn is recovering from cervical cancer who takes on trying to form young Jamie about how to be a man. Coming from a feminist perspective, not long out of the art world of New York she is confident of her body, yet unsure of her future. Whilst Jamie’s friend Julie (Elle Fanning) two years older than Jamie we see that they share a bed, and just sleep, very odd for a teenage couple, yet they are just friends which confuses the audiences and indeed Jamie. She is also asked to help form the young man, bringing with her raw adolescent female experience to her teaching. Both these women are hoping in their own ways to shape Jamie in their image of men or the ideal, which ultimately is an impossible task for anyone.

Turning to Jamie himself, on the surface he’s just another teenage guy having fun, exploring his new-found emotions and pushing the boundaries – nothing new there. However the more time we spend with him we can see that he’s a sensitive guy, open to understanding what it is to be a man, something we all learn to grapple with. Surrounded by female advice alone he can have to choose what works for him. You can see how the directors was formed in this sly autobiography of his formative years. Whilst the rabbit in the hat in William who sits in the background while a lot of the film goes on, we have to work out his position. Before he gets more screen time and we learn his place, his past which was formed in the 1960’s, trying to fit in to stay with his girlfriend. Just wanting to be loved, doing what he can stay happy, very human if you think about it.

I found that the narration by all, especially Bening’s to be confusing half way through, talking from the past about the future, even from the grave as we learn, as if this is her message to the living. At the half way point I thought we were at the end before things start to heat up for the characters, the formation of Jamie really begins to unravel and come back to hit Dorothea. What she wanted the women to do backfires to a point, her ideas of being a man are far different from those who are younger, its a generational gap that leaves her taken aback.

20th Century Women presents us with a time which has long since left us, ideas of what being a man or a woman have changed greatly too. It’s a glimpse back to a simpler time, but was it really, it looks that way – on the surface anyway. It was a refreshing to see cut-away to stills to illustrate ideas, even if they’re recycled, the intent is different as we draw the film to a close. It’s delightfully light at times reminding you not to take life too seriously even when it can be overwhelming at times.


Film Talk – The 1960’s Dream – Part 1


The second in my ongoing series if Film Talks I’m running at the Rothley Community Library. I decided to discuss two films this time A Kind of Loving (1962) and Midnight Cowboy (1969) both directed by John Schlesinger. Below are the notes from the night.

Tonight I’ll be taking a look at one of last months recommendations – A Kind of Loving (1962), which I noticed was directed by John Schlesinger who went onto make Midnight Cowboy (1969). I’ll start by sharing what makes a Kitchen sink drama or has otherwise been known as a British New Wave or Social Realism. Before moving onto look at A Kind of Loving and drawing comparisons with Midnight Cowboy.

So what is a Kitchen Sink Drama? I think you have to look at Britain socially first, in order to inform these films. I turned to The Social Structure of Modern Britain – E.A. Johns (1965); which is dated by today’s standards, but nonetheless allowed me to see how society was perceived at the time of writing. I first focused on the family,

…the view currently held by many eminent writers is that the family has been stripped of the functions which are essential to its cohesion, and that parents have abnegated their responsibilities in favour of the government-run organs of the Welfare state.

Pg. 25

These essential functions of the family are :

  • Provision of a home
  • Production and rearing of children
  • Stable satisfaction of sex need

R.M. MacIver – Macmillan 1957

Johns continued on the family by quoting W.J.H Sprott who argued that

“…The family, under Western cultural conditions has shrunk functionally” and that the social services are basically “anti-family” in that they cater almost exclusively for the individual rather than the family as a whole. This view is supported up to a point by M.Penelope Hall when she quotes the article on Social Policy and the Family…This document remarks that the family has until recently, been given only a minor place in social policy, “and over-all effect has been to lower status of the family in the national life”. Day nurseries and school meals, for example encourage a mother to go to work, but do not encourage her to create a home for her children

Pg.25-6

There’s an improvement in opportunities for young mothers wanting to be independent, which would have a knock on effect. Whilst also looking at increased leisure time available in modern Britain.

“…the increasing adoption of the 5-day working week and introduction of labour-saving devices in the home both mean that families have more leisure time. The characteristically democratic structure of most modern families mean that husbands and wives spend more of this time together.

Pg. 27

I also looked at the position of women in the 60’s, first looking at the jobs they have

Married women stats

25-34 years – 2/3 are employed

35-44 years – ¾ are employed

45-54 – 2/3 are employed.

Types of work include

  • distribution – insurance – banking – catering – laundries (industry jobs)
  • Hairdressing – domestic service – nursing (tertiary jobs)
  • Clerks – typists – shop assistance (“white-blouse brigade”)

These statistics only account for married women in employment. What about when the married couple moves away from the family home into the newly built housing estates?

Another factor…is that when families make the sudden transition from an old-established neighbourhood with a strong social life to a virgin housing estate, they may experience a good deal of loneliness, at least initially. The wives, in particular. may miss the gossip and chatter of the streets, and see a substitute in the companionship of the office or factory

Pg. 37

Lastly looking at marriage and divorce, which was made more accessible, however divorce was only granted under certain conditions. This passage still carries some weight today regarding the failure of marriages.

I think the most significant element, however, is the egalitarianism which characterizes the relationship between married partners today, by contrast with the patriarchal authoritarianism which was accepted as the normal pattern in the nineteenth century…The marriage a girl enters today has far more stresses than her grandmother’s. A partnership needs much more forbearance than the situation which the wife just used to accept the idea of doing what she was told.

Pg. 46

It does however acknowledge that number of younger couples getting married, and why. The most obvious is the reason why our main characters Vic and Ingrid in A Kind of Loving.

In 1960, nearly 62,000 extra-maritally conceived children were born to women married for less than 8 months (usually 5 or 6). Translated into proportion of all marriages this means that one in five brides was pregnant, and it is well established that the shot-gun marriage is more likely to break down.

Pg. 47

Johns doesn’t mention the introduction pill was made available with slowly increased access to it.

At first it was only prescribed to married women – most older women who had already had children and wanted no more…In the past most women had to married at an early age, being expected to give up their job and become a full-time housewife and mother wile their husband went out to work. If a woman wanted to follow a career she had to give up thoughts of marriage. Now, married could, if they chose, plan a career, and rigid gender based division of roles began to change. It was the beginning of both a social and sexual revolution, and there was much talk of the ‘permissive society’ and ‘free love’

Life in the 1960s – Mike Brown Pg. 9

So we have some social context around the Kitchen Sink Drama we know that they are focused on working class issues. If you’ve ever seen one you’ll notice they are mostly in Northern locations complete with the rich accents. They are devoid of special effects, the gloss that you get over in Hollywood or Europe lets take a closer look at the key directors of the movement. The subjects they covered were.

Now lets take a quick look at the key directors of the movement.

Tony Richardson who made Look Back in Anger (1959) mentioned during our discussion last month, it starred Richard Burton as a middle class student with grudges towards the working class.

Lindsay Anderson gave us This Sporting Life (1963) starring Richard Harris about an angry young rugby player who resists the fame and fortune that is coming his away.

Karel Reisz made possibly one of the more popular titles Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) with Albert Finney about a factory worker who gets a married woman pregnant.

Then we have John Schlesinger who began his career as an actor in his early twenties before making his directorial debut with a 30-minute documentary about Waterloo station – Terminus. A year later he made his feature film debut with A Kind of Loving, which saw him work with producer Joseph Janni for the first of 6 films together. It’s also the first starring role for Alan Bates.

The film follows a young man Vic (Alan Bates) who falls for Ingrid (June Ritchie), which starts off like a school romance, the passing of notes, the boys fighting, and the social dances. That’s all until Ingrid falls pregnant after they both loose their virginity. This is when the dream of a carefree romance starts to fall away opening them up to married life. In the first few weeks of marriage they are living at her home with her mother played by Thora Hird. Who makes life difficult for them under her roof. It’s her way or the highway, and they can’t really afford to leave just yet. The classic mother-in-law type brings reality crashing down for them. She’s hardly in the film but makes a strong impression on Vic who until recently was free to come and go as he pleased, now assuming the role of the husband. I’d like to show you the portion of the film (stills below) when the school romance fades away as they become adults.

In part two coming I draw comparisons with John Schlesinger’s last film of the decade – Midnight Cowboy.


Painting the Town… Update (19/2/17)


A day later than planned but without any more delay I’d like to share yesterdays events in the studio. It’s been back to operation “add detail” to most of the model bar two or three which are ready for the paint to be applied. It was all about the matchsticks creating the detail, with them being almost to exact size in some cases I have used them to create simple gestures that are completing these simple model miniatures. I know I say this a lot but I am really please with how things are going.

I might be getting out the paint next time as I make a start on some of the models, whilst a few need more work to them. It wont be much but will make all the difference.


Painting the Town Update (18/2/17)


After writing last weekend off due to the weather I have made a much-needed return to the studio again. I decided to call a halt to making any more model miniatures for now. Focusing on my now scaled down collection, adding some minor details to them all.

I began by adding the roofing to sides of the models, which I should more or less complete next time. I also turned to using match-sticks for the posts for a few of the pieces. I’ve discovered that these pieces will be harder to paint, I’m also amazed at how these little additions complete them even before paint is even added.

I’m looking forward to adding the last details before painting gets underway.


Take a Tour of my Studio – 2


I was recently at a family do, chatting with one of my cousins who was interested in my work and studio. I wanted to share photographs of my studio, which I shamefully didn’t have. I had plenty of my work though. Also it’s been 3 years since I last allowed you into my studio at Two Queens in Leicesters Cultural quarter. The space has changed a lot since that original post. My work has grown, changing in medium and scale over that time. I still have a few old model hiding under the cardboard which I have collected, whilst the space is in a constant state of change as I move from one work to another.


53 Postcards – video


I’m finally able to share with the video of my debut performance – at Imp-Fest (2016) at Hornsey Town Hall Arts Centre, London 19/11/16. It will be available here for a short time, taking up its home over here. I would like to thank my sister – Rachel for documenting it over the course of 3 performances that night. Here is an edited version of the whole night.


Beau Geste (1939)


beau-geste-1939A few months ago I wrote a review about Barbary Coast (1935) which saw the Western trying to survive in the guise of another genre, then the gangster which if you think about is/was an updated version of that genre. It was fascinating to see what is honestly a much forgotten film, even with Edward G. Robinson in the lead, a fish out of water whose the shark that swims with the fishes who are the genre. Staying with the 1930’s, and the struggling Western I came across the sub genre of the Victorian epic, a more familiar film is Gunga Din (1939) however I’d like to focus on Beau Geste (1939) also.

As Richard Slotkin explained in Gunfighter Nation it was the Western in a different guise, moving the action from one large nation to another, which could be England or France throughout their all-conquering empire. Here we have the French aristocracy and 3 English brothers who’ve been adopted into it. Before meeting the brothers we see a troop of the Foreign Legion arriving at an outpost, populate entirely with the dead soldiers who once occupied. You can see they all died in battle, hanging over the parapet in the fort. They have all met grisly ends, that much is clear, we don’t yet know how they reached that fate.

Jumping back 15 years we meet these 3 brothers as children in the comfort of a stately home in the country, playing war in the pond with model battleships complete with explosives. From a young age they want to go off and play war. When a side looses instead of leaving it as that, onto the next campaign they treat the loosing side with respect, sending the loosing side off into the waters, setting fire to them, enacting a Viking burial. They have a respect for the dead even at the tender ages of 10 if not younger. They have an understanding of gallantry and honor in the field of battle, something that we shall see come through in the film. After this scene we see the sale of a sapphire, however it doesn’t get passed the children who hide, one inside a suit of knights armor – Beau Geste, on the surface its funny to see the child hiding. He’s escaping into a soldier’s uniform that has probably seen battle. Now its acts as protection against unseeing eyes in peace time of France.

Moving forward 15 years again to almost the time we first started the film, we finally meet the adult brothers, who are not really English but young American stars, still who cares they sold tickets and I’m not going to knock Gary Cooper in anything from the 1930’s. It’s all happy families in the midst of the England which they will soon go out to protect. The young girl who knew the brothers, now a young woman Isobel Rivers (Susan Hayward) is now the affections for John Geste (Ray Milland). However before they leave the Blue Jewel, (not sure if it’s a sapphire goes missing in quick switching off of the lights. A family treasure’s stolen before them. Unusually before they begin to investigate they allow Isobel to leave, as she’s a woman she’s above suspicion. It’s gallantry of an old respectable world that sees her leave, Leaving only the men and Lady Patricia Brandon (Heather Thatcher) and the men to work it out.

They don’t get very far before the action soon moves to a desert in Morocco, two of the brothers Beau and Digby (Robert Preston) are now in uniform, they’ve done their training and now ready for to defend the Empire. It’s all one happy Empire out here, and the troops are keeping the peace. This can easily be translated to America, enlisted soldiers living on the fort, protecting civilians from “Indian attack”. In Geste the land around this is sand dunes for miles, they are the only civilisation for miles. The new recruits are about to be introduced, the scruff’s that have made it this far are ready to defend. These include the final brother John who can’t be separated from them for long, combined with a strong of duty to his country.

I haven’t even looked at the broken chain of command, the power-driven Sergeant Markoff (Brian Donlevy) who will do anything to take command from the dying outpost commander Lieutenant Martin has died after a long fever leaving disciplinarian in command of the fort. This allows him to work on the men, bearing down hard on them like never before, making life hard for them. Training is over and a new regime has come into force. Teaming up with none thief and spy Rassinoff (J. Carrol Naish) who inform him of an impending mutiny among the men. They’ve had enough of being worked to death in this inhospitable landscape, time to rebel.

With all this set-up we go into a much darker second half that sees the fort pushed to the limit of endurance of following the chain of command. The Mutiny is soon thwarted when Markoff blows it wide open, placing all but the Geste brothers under arrest, they are the only ones with bayonets, armed but unable to fire at their fellow-men. The chain of commands being tested when hostile or Moroccan forces who surround them. It’s time to put the mutiny and prisoners to one side and defend, it’s all men to their stations – about 30 odd. You can see from the first wave that it’s futile to keep up the attack for too long. However this is a film and the Legionnaires must win, at least for now.Each wave represent an attack by Native Americans, coming back with more expendable warriors to fall at the guns of the Blue coats.

As the men start to fall they aren’t left as they fell, instead in a unorthodox manoeuver the fallen are propped up, acting as number of things. A second defence to take the bullets, as decoy soldiers acting as an improvised illusion, the appearance of more men when there are far less. The men left alive carry on, but know that once they fall they’re bodies will receive the respect of the fallen. I’ve never seen such a tactic used in on-screen battle, it’s a desperate move by a desperate man who wants not only power but wealth that’s promised in the rumor of the Sapphire being in the possession of one of the Geste brothers, Markoff will do anything for it. The rules if war and chain of command mean nothing to him. In the far off outpost they are alone and at times have to make up their own rules. It’s up to the Geste brothers to finally remind us of what they learned back home in England, they are the opposite of what the officers above them represent.

Maybe now I need to see more Victorian epics and see how they translate to the Western, see how the legends are created for another empire that can easily be rewritten for another. My exploration of this genre never ceases to amaze me.