Sorry, Wrong Number (1948)

A little over a week ago I caught The File on Thelma Jordan (1950), Barbara Stanwyck playing the standard femme fatale role, which wasn’t nearly as effective as Double Indemnity (1944). I was a little disappointed, having her play opposite Wendell Corey who is not a natural lead actor. Leaving her to go into overdrive to make this slow burner of a film noir even begin to simmer. It never really comes to the boil. Tonight’s film however was a very different story, a massive improvement on the leading man with Burt Lancaster and a complete role reversal for Stanwyck in Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), leaving me glued to the screen.

It’s great to see a screen veteran in Stanwyck able to play the damsel in distress still, even after 20 years on the screen, opposite up and coming Lancaster who is full of confidence clearly enjoying the chance to play opposite her. Even though characters are restricted by phone conversations and flashbacks that construct the film. Beginning with a stray connection, allowing bed-ridden socialite Leona Stevenson (Stanwyck) who only wants to talk to her husband who left the office hours ago. We have little idea how strong a role the telephone will play in Sorry, Wrong Number. A mumbled conversation about a murder plot is over heard on a cross-wire –  this isn’t even a shared line like the one found in Pillow Talk (1959), there’s no time for innuendo here. Wanting to do the right thing she’s back onto the operator to try and track down what is essentially an accidental connection.

She wants to reports the crime to the police, but has very little to go on, the time of a train, a New York street, not enough even for a detective to come out to her. Instead the station that took the call is more preoccupied with a baby. Law enforcement has been domesticated whilst shes crippled by an as yet unrevealed condition. We are left wondering how is she going solve this potential crime herself. It’s not like she’s living in a time when murders can be precisely predicted and prevented as in Minority Report (2002). Her only weapon is her phone. Watching this in a time where phones are now so much more than the basic communication device that connects one voice to another anywhere in the country, or even a distant part of the world. She has to rely on notes, memory and the accounts of those she calls. Building up a picture of what has happened, hopefully leading to a happy conclusion. Now we can use social media to broaden our reach, an audience less personal but able to make a bigger impact, then the killer might be stopped before times up.

I wanted to see both Lancaster and Stanwyck on-screen together, we only see this in flashback, understanding how they met and married. Using her position and money to attract Henry J. Stevenson (Lancaster) to marry her. Stanwyck plays a different of Femme fatale, not relying so much on her body and sex appeal, the lure of dangerous encounters. Her position and status are all that small town boy Henry needs, and someone being ignored to ensure they marry. A daddy’s girl who gets what she wants through her condition. A weak heart that could flare up at any minute to control the one she loves. We’ve moved away from simple marital manipulation to calm a situation down like Beulah Bondi in Vivacious Lady (1938) using an “a weak heart” for a simpler life. The wife in both situations is in control, stopping the husband in his tracks.

The flashbacks are the main way of building up the plot. We need to understand the garbled conversation. Who could be behind it. It takes an amateur bed-ridden detective with a phone racking up a massive phone bill to get to the bottom of this crime. One phone call her husbands secretary leads her in the direction of an old love rival Sally Ann Hunt (Ann Richards) who as we see plays detective, spying on her own husband, no-one can be trusted in this film. Wives can’t trust husband who don’t tell the truth or hold things back. It takes another conversation with her doctor Dr Phillip Alexander (Corey) who reveals her condition to be purely psychological, given the film a Freudian overtone, the mother from beyond the grave having a hold over her son-in-law.

All the conversations start to come together as we meet one of her fathers employees Waldo Evans (Harold Vermilyea) who adds the final piece of the puzzle that we have been trying to solve. It becomes even more complicated as a man trapped by marriage, wealth and all the trappings of his position, using them to plan his escape, calculated and cold until cracks begin to show. Leaving his wife alone in there home where she slowly looses her mind over the course of the film. A woman who once had all the control has lost everything, her independence, the care of the nurses, her husband and ultimately her life. A climax that leaves you wondering if she will be saved at the last minute, after all those calls, building up a case of confessions and evidence. If only she took the time to write it all down, its all if-only’s now. Left one one hell of a cliff-hanger.

Sorry, Wrong Number has been a film worth waiting for, the structure allows a plot to be told via technology rather than traveling around, the lead character visiting everyone as they carryout a physical investigation. Based instead entirely on her emotions, feelings running wild as she holds a phone receiver to her face. Ultimately it’s Stanwyck owns the film, bringing it into melodrama at times without loosing the darkness of the plot, a murder will be committed somewhere tonight, the only question is – whose the victim? She asks all these questions from the confines of her bedroom, slowly going mad with the help of some interesting crane and mirror shots, we really don’t know if she’s coming or going, it’s a real roller-coaster ride from start to finish.


Blow Out (1981) & Blow Up (1966) – Revisited

I’ve been curious about Blow Out (1981) for a while now upon learning that is was Brian De Palma response and remake of Michelangelo Antonioni‘s seminal film Blow Up (1966) which I reviewed a few years ago, finding it quite profound and left me contemplating how we deconstruct images that we capture on a daily basis, what lies under the surface of them. If we delve further are we prepared for what we find once we explore. Do we want to see and accept the hidden truth. Questions I hope to revisit and maybe find some answers in my join revisit review.

Moving forward 15 years to De Palma’s remake, a really clever reworking even on the surface level, a film in its own right away from the more obvious connections in terms of title and the protagonists discovery, audio or photo-chemical, it plunges them into a world they never wish they intended to enter. Jack (John Travolta) a sound-recordist for low-budget Hitchcockesque slasher knock-offs is working on his latest collaboration with Sam (Peter Boyden) whose advised that the scream of his shower victim is pathetic to say the least, leaving his film without the impact that he wants or really needs to sell the shower murder which opened up the film. Leading to Jack going out on a late-night sound recording session for the long list he’s been given.

The recording scene has strong links to The Conversation (1974) which saw reclusive anorak Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) on an intensely observed and documented recording of a couples seemingly innocent conversation. Carefully positioned kit from high above and around the square, picks up all the said conversation. Jack again is on a job, more isolated on a bridge with his exposed recording equipment, no need to hide as he points to what he wants to capture on tape. He’s a pro and takes a joy in the process, even getting a thrill out of catching a lovers conversation, carrying on even when they know he’s there. An audio peeping tom you could say, capturing what he wants for his own pleasure. It’s here we see the even that the rest of the film hinges on, a car-crash that carried presidential candidate Governor McRyan (John Hoffmeister) plunges to his death. On the surface it’s a straight-forward incident, until Jack jumps in to save them, finding a woman Sally (Nancy Allen) fighting to stay above the rising water level.

It all starts to get murky when we get the hospital, not yet knowing the identity and position of those involved in the car that careened off the road into the river. There’s a sense of urgency as a cover-ups suggested, for the Governor to be known to be in a car with a woman, a prostitute that could have jeopardized his political chances. The plot literally thickens with Sally being involved, her part is hushed up, and hopefully Jacks too. The role of the women is questionably changed from  Jane (Vanessa Redgrave) wanting the film from snooping photographer Thomas (David Hemmings) who very easily fobs her off with a blank roll. Sally is more submissive, more agreeable to be told to get out of town for a while, let the situation blow over. Jack unlike David is more proactive, wanting to understand what’s going on.

Technology plays a bigger role in the remake, sound being the main evidence to explore, Not only has he got to be sure of what he’s hearing, he has to prove that to the Police who want to close the case as an accident. I was fascinated how he synchronised photographs that were taken (by peeping tom Manny Karp (Dennis Franz)) which brings the evidence to life. There’s more immediacy to not just prove his theory right but also act on it, inform the police, or even the press who will make even more noise. The sense of urgency is palpable here, where as Blow Up is more secretive, more investigative, wanting to know for sure himself before doing anything, or nothing, instead changing his perception.

Jack’s perception of the worlds more open, aware of the corruption in the world thanks to his past job working with undercover police to fight corruption. This discovery has to be acted on, hoping if he does it right he can redeem himself and save himself from more guilt. I’ve not even mentioned Burke (John Lithgow) a rogue element whose acts on his own for the corrupt opposition, creating his own trail of bloody murder to cover his tracks. An extra element that was only suggested in the original that creates real tension, an unknown element to Jack for the majority of the film.

Blow Out is a near perfect thriller that goes a bit too far at times, the 360 degree camera moves really should have been more restrained at times, becoming too literal, yes we get it, everything is out his his control. I found the addition of Burke’s murders of women who looked like Sally being killed, manipulating the audience to the point of pushing us over the edge, always seeing the victims from the back before he goes ahead. Now I look forward to revisiting the original, how will my memories hold up and else will I discover. It was a sparse and shocking film even then, next time I’ll be looking at the relationship between the two.

It’s been over two months since I sat down for Blow Out, before returning for the original Blow Up (1966) inspiring De Palma to remake it, which on reflection is a fitting tribute and really has built on this almost silent thriller. I remember being fired up by the film, going off the recommendation at Art school to seek this one out. I was very pleased with the end result. I had forgotten the begging as our photographer Thomas exits a factory at the end of what appears to be the working day. However his is just getting started. We’re given the wrong impression about him, he’s not just another worker, the Rolls Royce is a clear indicator that he’s a successful man who is able to support himself. Yet is self-conscious enough to hide his car, from the workers or just the his in. Back at his studio he becomes what could be Weinstien-esque artist, working with his latest model, wanting to get the best out of her, showing little respect for the woman herself. As the poster misleads me this time, she’s the model he’s enjoying through his camera, reaching an almost sexual climax.  

He treats his models much like he does his staff, with little respect, they are just glad to be there, and little attention is given to them in the film. Just supporting him in the studio and his whims, allowing him to live the life of luxury and creative freedom. Coming and going as he pleases, during his next shoot he asks his 5 models to close their eyes, whilst he leaves the studio to chat with his painter friend Bill (John Castle) whose enjoying his own creativity and the attention of his lover/muse Patricia (Sarah Miles). They are all enjoying the bubble that is the swinging sixties. Creatively it looks amazing to been a part of that moment that’s depicted here as something that then takes a horrible turn to the darkness of reality.

On his comings and goings, after buying a wooden propeller he ventures to the local park, just see whats there, getting carried away he becomes a member of the paparazzi, or a peeping tom documenting what looks like an affair between an older man (Ronan O’Casey) who we always see from a distance. The first of a number of scenes films dialogue free, only the wind interrupts this intimate intrusion into the private lives of these lovers. The minimalism of the scene allows us to really get lost in what is happening in this section of the park, we are now as bad as Thomas who happily captures this private moment. We are complicit in this voyeuristic act and we’ll have to pay for that later on. Until Thomas’s spotted, causing Jane (Redgrave) to chase after him, rightfully wanting the film that has caught them in the act of something quite private.

On his return to the studio, we are as surprised he is to found Jane’s found him, out of nowhere, everything is a surprise in this film. Antonio has layered with characters throughout his film that keep appearing out of nowhere, unexpected visitors that come in and out of the photographers day slowing him down, or should I say wearing him down the images in the park begin to unveil a dark secret that he wished he never discovered. The mime artist who he meets on the road, happily given them money, creatives support or sponsorship, it’s very vague. Two young girls who will do anything to model for him reappear, whose innocence’s taken advantage off. Jane’s time however is most compelling, Redgrave’s treated with more respect, yes she undresses, in hopes of securing the roll of film. Yet we never see her breasts, I thought I had from memory, however she’s photographed more respectfully than the other actresses who’re treated like modelsShe indulges as best she can, clearly out of her depth with the photographer whose not about to give up on his latest roll.

Now the fun really begins, I say fun, the darkness of his latest photographs make themselves known to him. Again we go near silence as he develops and investigates the work, getting deeper, more curious to what is going on in the images. What at first could be a couple uncomfortable at a peeping tom becomes more sinister. He can’t give up, instead he continues to investigate, blowing up sections of the stills to understand the hidden landscape that he was capturing. It’s haunting to see the reveal in near silence, as he learns we learn to. A discovery that can no longer be hidden away, they can’t become part of a body of work, as they document a crime, the photographer an unwitting witness to something he wasn’t expecting.

Where Thomas is alone in his world, Jack is more vocal in Blow Out, the film allows more time to investigate and reach out to others. The original is built upon, allow is to move away from the initial shock of the discovery to look at the wider consequences, how they can affect others. We don’t really know what happens to Jane after she leaves, does she know her lovers dead or is she just relieved to know that her little secret won’t get out. Instead see just the beginning and the effect is has on someone who really shouldn’t have been there.

The end of the film has left me feeling pretty much the same, the mime artists playing tennis, lost in their own world, their craft. Thomas looks on wondering how he now fits into this world that he believed was part of. It’s just increased, revealing a far darker side, one that he has hoped to escape. Even the middle class trappings of his own have hidden him from life. The world of sex, drugs and rock and roll (courtesy of The Yardirds) he has to reassess his position, his perspective. Does all his work hide something lurking under the surface, He captures what he sees through the lens, ignoring the world around him. Unlike Jack who was more aware of the world around him, but chose to escsape it for the world of low-budget films, creating his own reality. Having seen both films, I can clearly see how De Palma has built on a minimalist film about the truth of our reality, how an artist who  can be lost in the world of their work can be brought back to reality through the work they make.

Painting the Town…Update (6/2/18)

A few posts ago I shared the first of two test videos of the my The Great Silence projection tests. Tonight I can share the second half, which I feel as interesting as it maybe, it has little in terms of distortion, it’s too easy to see the image. Projecting onto the floor reveals too much, it’s too easy for the viewer to make out whats going on. I want them to stay and work it violence being projected. I’ll be going with the first test. Now its just a matter of bring every test together.

Painting the Town… Update (3-4/2/17)

I was going to post 2 updates this weekend, however I was at the cinema catching Phantom Thread (2017). So I’ll bring you up to date now. I began the weekend by wanting to look at how the presentation of the final piece will look. With a lack of  kit to do this properly I decided to return to a tried and test formula, maquettes, which allow me to look at this on a smaller scale, without the worry of space of setting everything up and hoping that it somehow make sense as I switch from one piece to another. The first day saw me make a start on the first 3 of the 4. Working at a smaller scale I’ve reduced the detail again so I know the piece by a few gestures made in the piece.

I came back today to complete the 3rd and 4th pieces that was still outstanding. I know there are about 1.20 scale so they are all about the same size still, allowing me to understand how they will relate to each other. I’m tempted to even make stand in projectors on tripods – or signifiers. Once they were all complete I added plinths that replicated the heights of the cardboard tables which I’ve been working with so far. I feel that these pieces need there own purpose built plinths, they would also need to work around whats already on the boxes.

I then made a start on a few set-ups to see what works. As much as I want the cross formation I don’t want to limit myself as whats possible. I saw a number that could work. Always having them in pairs I continued to rearrange them. It’s given me a few to consider. I can even take them on the road when the work is installed in a shows so I can see what works too. All I need now is the extra kit to see how the real thing works.

Lastly I have finally finished work on the new tables for Minnies Haberdashery, installing them into an already crowded pieces. I was able to manuveur my glue-gun around, just being mindful of the beams already in place. This brings the piece inline in terms of detail with the other models in the work. I can now just focus on the last hurdle.

The Last Train from Gun Hill (1959)

My first encounter with The Last Train from Gun Hill (1959) was a few years ago when I was working on Dancing in the West (2013), which features a few pieces of found footage from the film. I have more in Iron Horse of the Studio (2015) which lifted the train outside and arriving into Gun Hill where the majority of the action takes place. Otherwise I had very little knowledge of the film beyond that fact it starred Kirk Douglas who arrives on the train.

But why does he arrive in Gun Hill asking for Craig Belden (Anthony Quinn). Away from anything even related to Trains we have a Native American mother and son, whose clearly mixed race, he has a white father. Riding through the woods on a horse drawn buggy. Passing Rick Belden (Earl Holliman) and Smithers (Brian G. Hutton) who are her attackers and killers. It’s pretty obvious what their intentions are they as they up alongside them. Throwing the boy aside, they don’t wait long before they rape and kill her. Usually it’s the white woman whose raped by the Native American in the classical form of the Western. Here the roles are reversed, the woman – Catherine Morgan (Ziva Rodann) whose seen as worthless and little more than a sexual plaything to be abused as if she has no soul – not in the Christian white man’s view.

Back in her home town, a group of boys are after a retelling of a classic gunfight from 9-10 years ago. Gun control has been enforced in this town, making it a far safer place to be, far from the crime committed in the wilderness of the frontier. Town Marshall Matt Morgan (Kirk Douglas) whose happy to retell the story, creating his own legend for awestruck kids who want to experience the danger of the past as modern day audiences do through watching these films. It’s only when he’s led by his son to his wife body. Clearly upset and equipped with evidence (a saddle with the initials B.C.) He knows where he must go, but doesn’t know what he will really find on arrival. His old friend Craig Belden, could he be the killer and rapist of his wife or is there more to this than meets the eye. Turning against a friend is something no man wants to do or takes lightly.

We haven’t even met patriarch and cattle baron Belden who has power not just over his son but also the town of Gun Hill. Not only does he want his saddle but he allows his son to be beaten up by his right hand-man. A sadistic side that is rarely seen, usually the father deals out the violence himself, not delegating to his staff, who happily  take over. It’s a challenge to his son’s Rick manhood. He wants him to defend himself, not so much to win but to stand his ground. Belden could be compared with Broken Lance‘s (1954) Matt Devereaux (Spender Tracy) driven by power, mistrust and frustration. His whole family are slowly driven. Whilst a grief-stricken Morgan dressed in black throughout the rest of the film, arrives with the saddle in tow, he knows what he has to do is going to hurt. Is he an avenger of death in human form with the protection of a marshal’s badge, allowing him to deal out the justice he seeks, that any other man would have to be careful to achieve.

Gun Hill to Morgan is like traveling back in time to the lawless town he once tamed, except it’s not his to even attempt to tame. Instead to try and remove two elements to face justice back home. No one is prepared to help in, living in the pockect’s of his old friend who will allow safe passage on the last train if his son goes free. It’s a lot to ask of Morgan having come all this way to give up on his mission without so much as a fight. He does have one ally in the long-term girlfriend Linda (Carolyn Jones) who wont even go home with Belden. Her reluctance works in the favour of the visiting marshal, an angel you could say whose fighting her own conscience in a town that wants her to conform. Proposing a wager on her own success, only to withdraw when she realises she’s just as bad as them. A typical woman of the frontier whose in s relationship with the man of the town, only to see the error of her ways. However she’s soul searching throughout the film, making her stand apart from other women in the genre.

I come away from Gun Hill  a western that really does manipulate the world it’s functioning in. retelling stories of the West as if it’s all be won. A Train that rides right into the middle of town to position it as the main focus of the film. Whilst a marshal is happy to stay in the comfort of a hotel room waiting for the right time to face the music of the town that wants him dead. The hotel room becomes his own prison and temporary marshals office, working away from home, the law never left him throughout his time in Gun Hill is short lived but he has an effect that hopefully will send ripples through the town. I’m glad I’ve been able to piece together the clips I’ve seen previously, making sense of them now has allowed me to see a more complex western that could be darker. Made up with solid performance by a cast who are enjoying a script that goes further than your standard corruption in town.

Straw Dogs (1971)

I’m hoping to see 4 of Sam Peckinpah films, Straw Dogs (1971) is the first one out of the gates, and very much by chance too. I remember reading about the film long before I really considered seeking it out – the article focused on the infamous rape scene which is probably one of the most violent scenes I have ever watch on screen. It was also a chance to see how the director, a few years after the success of The Wild Bunch (1969) and the quirky melancholic musical Western The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970) with far less violence than it’s predecessor. Moving forward he would be going across the Atlantic to a completely different environment – Great Britain, involved in no conflicts, yet struggling with rolling strikes and blackouts. The summer of love is long behind us and things are looking bleak.

Mathematician David Sumner (Dustin Hoffman) has moved to rural Cornwall to be with his new wife Amy (Susan George) who from the first few minutes is very much seen from the male gaze, the camera pans down to focus on her chest, clearly not wearing a bra. Partly out of women’s liberation and easily seen as a directorial decision to engage the male before they’re shocked later on in the film. They have just bought a hunting trap, Peckinpah has sewn a seed early on for what to expect later on. You can’t remove the potential image for violence, a man caught within the teeth of the trap that for most of the film’s fixed to the wall. I notice early on, children are dancing in a graveyard, whilst local pedophile Niles (David Warner) looks on quietly at them, not fully aware of what he’s capable of. I’m wondering where he fits into the dynamic of the film, hovering in the background used as a minor character. Warner is sadly not even credited for his role which is staggering when you see his role increase at a pivotal moment in the film.

We learn that Sumner decided to move into his wife’s family home to allow him to study and write his book, something he really wants to focus on. Having escaped his own countries violence, he can finally begin with hopefully fewer distractions. That’s not considering the sexual distraction of his newly wed wife, who sees the world around her far differently to the naive American intellectual whose still finding his feet in this foreign world. They have employed roofers who leer over Amy at any chance they get. The only attractive female in the film, she’s the only object of desire her even though she’s married, it doesn’t stop their actions. David is oblivious to all of this until he is forced to confront what is only going to be an increase of violence against the couple. I’ve not even touched upon Tom Hedden (Peter Vaughan) who spends the first half of the film in the local pub, seen as the town drunk. We don’t yet know how much power he yields over the men in the village. He’s the Cornish equivalent to a gang leader, a translation of the Western villain to British countryside. His influence and position in the community allow him a certain freedom, he’s probably never left the village since he was born.

Diversionary tactics come into play, taking David away from his wife on what is a very British past-time; Pheasant shooting, a right of passage for those in the country and part of society. The same men who have been work on the barn roof for the couple take him away, into a civilised arena of violence. Hoffman again plays the innocent, useless with a gun at first. Instead of shooting a man, who can potentially defend himself he aims at the defenceless birds who can’t seem to kill at first. When he finally kills he’s repulsed by what he has just done. Instead of taking home his kill for dinner he leaves the lifeless bird in peace. Juxtaposed with the rape scene which the film is now known for, the build up to the attack is pretty calm, as Charlie Venner (Del Henney) whom she previously had a relationship with, moves in to forcibly seduce. It becomes increasingly uncomfortable to watch as he gains control, ripping her clothes from her body before he rapes her. Where it becomes blurry for me is when it moves from what looks like rape to possibly consensual, she somehow accepts him and allows him to make love (in the loosest possible terms). Has she given in to his forceful actions, her past feelings overwhelm her working in his favour. The changes with the introduction of Norm Scutt (Ken Hutchison) carrying a rifle, he want a part of her, he wants a share of the action. Amy returns to being an object to be abused, returning her to a victim. I feel uncomfortable again, the sweaty bodies, is not just sexual joy, but pure terror and transfer of empowerment from woman to the men who have violated her. During the scene we have the first flourishes of slow-motion – the Peckinpah signature, here it’s to display the pain and violence towards Amy who has lost her freedom.

This experience naturally stays with Amy and the audience for the remainder of the film, we are forced to experience the imagery in a packed village hall. As she’s forcing herself to try and return to normality, it’s too. She can’t comes to terms with it during the course of the film, events won’t allow her to. When Hedden’s daughter Janice (Sally Thomsett) who we see leading Niles away to try and take advantage of him. She wants to abuse his innocence, unaware of his true nature she meets a fate similar to Lennie Hall’s victim in Of Mice and Men. Unaware of either’s power it ends fatally for Janice, the first victim of the night.

The finale of the film is long and drawn out, from what begins as a car accident develops into a full blown home invasion as Hedden on the look out for Niles now in the care of still innocent Sumner who wants to defend his house turns into a homestead under act from the natives who use all their forces to try and break through. A once civilised man is broken as he turns to violence, doing all he believes is necessary to protect his home from outsiders who want to kill his guest and obligation, wanting to do the right thing becomes very dark and murky. I’m reminded of the farmer Tony Martin who shot dead a burglar after entering his property. He too went to fatal lengths to ensure the safety of his property, sparking a nationwide debate. A real-life parallel, not as extreme as the Hollywood depiction, we can still see the lengths that even a quiet man will to.

We don’t truly get to see what happens to the last men standing, where do they go from here. Have the images of a war that have been broadcast daily on his TV been subliminally brainwashing him to pick up a gun a shoot. Has his countries love for guns become part of his identity, laying dormant ready to be awoken. I leave the film shaken by the imagery, the intensity of violence an intense and relentless barrage that we are more than glad to end. I’m now interested to see how the violence couple dynamic is carried through to The Getaway (1972), a modern day Bonnie and Clyde (1967) who get a thrill from violence, unlike the Sumner’s who used it as a last resort.

Painting the Town… Update (28/1/18)

It’s a rather short day, however I’ve done all I’ve set out to do. Before I get onto what happened today I want to share the video documentation of the projection tests from last time in the studio. I’ve placed both tests alongside each other to see how they look. The Unforgiven one is short by about 20 seconds. I could match that longer one Yurusarezaru mono to take out portions. However that could effect the impact or effectiveness of the piece. Of course these are only test and I have yet to shortened/remove the gaps, which will effect both pieces. It could be a vicious circle.

Moving onto today’s projection tests with the latest piece – The Great Silence (1968) which I’ve found to be very successful. That’s with the piece in two positions I tried out. I’m now torn as to which way I go, the standard straight on approach on it’s side. Having the projection direction onto the back wall gives it a sense of place, we can see that the action took place in this setting. Yet when its projected onto the floor there’s something else going on. The image is more clear, yet I’ve always like how the furniture breaks up the image, it’s more dramatic. I need to see how the video footage works when I review it later.

Lastly the painting of the replacement tables is almost over, I’m thinking another coat and they can be installed. I’ll run another projection test to see how they footage works against them.

Painting the Town… Update (27/1/18)

I feel I’m getting back to 100% now so I can put more of myself into the work again. Allowing me today to finally bring two of the model miniatures together. It’s been a day of progress with a massive limitation which I’ll get to later. I began the day by getting the paint out again to add another coat to the remaining pieces. Which are slowly becoming a solid white.

I spent the majority of my day in the project space starting to see how the finished piece will look which is finally starting to come together. I’ve been working with the extended saloon and the Japanese piece, which I forgot how heavy it actually is when I brought it down to the space. Sadly I can’t see the two projected at the same time as yet, something I need to work on (financially). Looking at how these two pieces work opposite each other, which is still hard to tell really. What I do know is that they need to be at least 3-4 meters apart, allowing for the projected image sit in the pieces and the audience to explore them. The saloon front is now being dropped, they will add nothing to the look of the pieces. At least one wont be sitting to allow this to happen. Also the work will be in a dark space, which leaves them invisible to the viewer, so I’m wasting my time on these pieces.

On a positive, staying with presentation pieces I looked at how the extended saloon would work on its side, the open section looking on facing the table. I would have needed to paint an otherwise hidden piece that was left bare as its generally out of view.  Looking similar to the Japanese piece which really needs to be on it’s side to work. I am however considering removing the suspended light as it does create an obstruction. I know that once it’s removed, its not going back in.

So I need to invest in more kit, sooner rather than later as I realise this piece. If I am to see how at least a pair work together they need to be projecting simultaneously, then I can look at timing of the pieces which is also important to how each pair works, do they play together or one after the other? I need to ask the questions to know how things will look.

Hancock (2008)

I began this film thinking that Hancock (2008) would be a fun anti superhero take on the genre. Not dark like Logan (2017) yet allowed us to see another side to the superhero life. Taking its cue more from The Incredibles (2004) which took the view of super heroes living in hiding, trying to lead a normal life. After years of saving the day, the consequence the secondary damage that they caused in the build up to saving the day. The people they were saving were starting to resent these more gifted individuals for causing destruction and increasing insurance premiums – it’s a real-world look at the genre, with all the glory comes the job, becoming a nuisance essentially. That’s the point where we find Hancock – (Will Smith) who we find sleeping rough after another heavy night of drinking.

OK we are off to a weird start already. The titular hero is not upstanding, he’s not a billionaire, or living comfortably. This hero’s flawed and as we find just doesn’t care. Saving the day for the police who have been in pursuit of a 4×4. He flies in, landing a little too heavy – damage straight away to the highway. Before he meets up with the outlaws, ripping into the car, sitting down to have a chat. It’s so casual he doesn’t even care about whats happening to him, or those around him. Ultimately he racks up the most damage of his career to date in LA. This is the Hancock of the first half the film and the better half too.

After saving the life of PR guy – Ray (Jason Bateman, in a cheery role) from a train about to turn him into mincemeat. he takes it upon himself to transform the image of the down and almost out superhero whose used to the abuse, the destruction that he’s caused. Ray is very much the opposite of Hancock more optimistic, hard-working and wanting to find the best in everyone he meets. He’s nothing special really but sees something in his new hero that he wants to nurture, good job he knows a thing or two about promotion then. Providing him with just a cleaner, better public image will only go skin deep, what’s needed is a better understanding of why he’s a drunk, not caring about all the destruction he causes.

It’s decided the way forward is to go to prison, pay his dues and make the public want and need him back. The idea of putting a super hero behind bars isn’t new – the villains of Gotham City are locked up in Arkham Asylum – emphasis on  the asylum part. Preventing them breaking free – or making it harder at least. It does however act as a chance to try and understand Hancock who needs to calm down, collect his thoughts before he’s needed back on the streets. Very much the anti hero, he sees the very image of the superhero to be hard to swallow, drawn to perform out of duty rather than an instinctive need.

His return to the streets is much restrained and you see the comedy starting the drain from the screen, a reformed character trying his best to put Ray’s teaching and advice into practice – possibly based on comic books he’s read. It becomes awkward and odd as the film shifts gears, trying to deliver a confused origin story. After some Superman-esque etchings in his prison cell (which are never really explained or mentioned). We’ve already met Mary (Charlize Theron) who has always held back around him, even when she makes a surprise visit to see him in prison. Finally coming into her own we see a very different side to him. She’s just like him, an unnamed race of superheroes and they are the last of their kind, first they are brother and sister, then they settle on being married for the past few centuries. Not that he remembers any of this which goes someway to explain his alcoholism.

Cue another messy superhero fight and plenty of devastation and the cats well and truly out of the bag now. It’s time to come clean and it’s an overly simplistic explanation that gets expanded upon at the close of the film. Oh I haven’t even mentioned the least scariest baddie – Red (Eddie Marsan) who just isn’t right for this ind of bad guy role. He is more than capable of doing so, as I’ve seen in Tyrannosaur (2011), here he’s not really trying, instead he’s gob-smacked to be in a Will Smith film, notably the first that saw the star start to loose his box office appeal. What follows is a rush to the finish line, try and make sense of all that’s happened and deliver an ending which is both dramatically effective, confusing and drawn out. I’m wondering when it’s all going to end at this point.

I came into this film with a lot of hope, something with real potential and comic moment which are lost in a more typical comic book super hero film. Tyring to cram in all the origins, the costumes and a twist, nothing is really satisfying once we get the to second half, it runs on what worked best in the first half and just goes at it until it’s just lost it completely. Now I can say I have seem the start of Smith’s decline in box office fortune. I just hope that such a charismatic guy can come back with a film that makes the best of his talents, push him but not depress and bore the audience in the process.

Painting the Town… Update (20/1/18)

I’ve made a small return to the studio, I’m not feeling 100% at the moment so I’ve only put in a few hours. Enough time to achieve what I want to. Beginning by painting the remaining tables and saloon front and coffin. Both are coming along nicely. Whilst I also completed the paint work on the buttresses.

The main focus was the extended saloon which is practically complete now, after ripping off two sides before rebuilding I have now a more fully formed saloon model miniature. Getting out the primer for the final coat of paint that allowed me to fix in the furniture and the bar into the model miniature. I just need to do some touch-up work and it’s complete.

Next time I’ll only have to focus on the saloon front and cardboard tables. Once I’m feeling better I will look to text the new piece and extended saloon as I have removed the false ceiling which really changes the shape of the space I’ve created.