Posts tagged “Comanche

Hostiles (2017)


It’s awards season and I’ve started early this year, not that I think that Hostiles (2017) is gunning for any awards, just the timing of the release in cinema’s. Nonetheless it’s a Western which means only one thing, I’m there. Booking the tickets even with a few warm reviews I decided I had to see this for myself. Based on the manuscripts of Donald E Stewart about an army captain who reluctantly takes on a mission that changes his politics. Now this is how Soldier Blue (1970) could have gone, but decided to be more literal. I also found a few links to The Searchers (1956) which I’m always looking to explore through other films.

After years of internal wars between the White settlers, who had been shaking up and re-organising the country into a shape that more resembled their own destiny, we forget about the soldiers and people who were caught up in the Indian Wars that have left the Native Americans greatly diminished and broken. Hostiles attempts to address some of those issues in this Revisionist Western. Beginning by reverting to classic form – a Comanche raid on a family who are massacred, it’s straight to the point, gruesome and sets the tone for what is to come. Leaving wife and mother Rosalie Quaid (Rosamund Pike) alone to bury her family, potentially altering her outlook on life too. She could have easily allowed racist tendencies to creep in and understandably too. It’s too later for Captain Joseph Blocker (Christian Bale) who is an embittered racist who has seen more than his fair share of bloodshed whilst in uniform. Easily seen as an extension of Ethan Edwards if he stayed in uniform. Yet his racism comes from another place, that is never really explored, leaving us to question how did he becomes this monster who could hate Native American’s that boils over when he discovers his family massacred, raped and captured also by Comanche’s. Blocker is given one last mission under threat of court-martial for refusing, to escort a now elderly Cheyenne chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) and his family back to their home land of Montana. Part of me thinks this is a test set by his commanding officer Col. Abraham Briggs (Stephen Lang) wants to see him suffer, to test his politics before the decorated officer retires. A big “Screw you” you could say.

The last time I saw Studi was as another historic Native American Geronimo in the 1993 film, here much older he gets slightly less screen time than his white colleagues who dominate. Showing there is still away go before they are given a fair representation in the genre. However they were portrayed with compassion unlike the Comanche who’re reduced to an obstacle to overcome – somethings never change. I’m not too surprised either, it’s a long ingrained part of the genre that is hard to shake. To achieve that they will have to be a Native American in the directors chair, with an un-compromised voice. That said The Cheyenne’s that are depicted with sensitivity, we can see they’re spirit has been broken but theirs hearts haven’t, which is the extent of the Cheyenne’s suffering is really explored.

The focus as always comes from the white man- Blocker whose our Ethan Edwards filled with racial intolerance for the Cheyenne that he has to escort across the open country. It’s his journey that we follow which has an interesting effect on him. Much like Edwards, he knows his foe very well, having learned to speak Cheyenne, he knows the enemy intimately, maybe too well. With the pomp of leaving his fort one last time he has his foe chained up, there’s no trust for the elderly warrior who puts up with this indignity. He wont rise to the bait, a decent man knows when he’s been defeated. This last throughout the discovering of the burnt out homestead where we find grief stricken Rosalie Quaid, everyone in the party can understand her pain. Pike delivers a heartfelt performance, you can really feel her pain, I wondered if she would cross into racial hate, making Yellow Hawks journey home even harder. Would her grief match the hate that of Blocker’s? Playing a vital part in Blocker’s transformation by the films close.

We start out of the fort with a small Master Sgt. Thomas Metz (Rory Cochrane) stricken with depression, Corp. Henry Woodsen (Jonathan Majors) who has been proud to serve with Blocker Lt. Rudy Kidder (Jesse Plemons) fresh out of West point ready to prove his superiors he’s worth his rank and French recruit Pvt. Philippe DeJardin (Timothée Chalamet) who has no real experience in the army. The small group meet resistance early on in the form of the Comanche who are the first of many obstacles on their long journey that has an effect on the number of men in uniform. Taking on Rosalie Quaid, could easily be seen as a burden to them. It’s the aftermath of these events that start to open up Blocker’s view of the world, starting to question his thinking. Finally confronted when he takes on army prisoner Corp. Tommy Thomas (not a very original name) (Paul Anderson) under the care of Sgt. Paul Malloy (Ryan Bingham).

Thomas is the equal of Blocker, yet he has used his racial hatred to kill a Native family whilst not under orders. Purely for them being there. A cold-blooded killer who shows no remorse for his crime, would Blocker have done the same out of uniform or has his uniform given him licence to kill and get away with it. The security position and rank have been enough, to go as far as Thomas would be a point of no return for the captain, or is this the next part of his life outside of the protection of the uniform.  The Indian Wars and Frontier nearly closed he would be a monster in civilised society, an Ethan Edwards in fine clothes.

There’s a lot of ground covered both literally (and spectacularly on camera) and thematically, from racism to man first killing to forgiveness. It goes along way to get us to Montana and it’s not an easy ride with a lot to think about. Filmed over the last year it can now be easily seen as a response to America today, as it becomes increasingly alone in its world view. The development of a wall on the Southern border with Mexico. The political divide is stronger than ever with a President who you either trust implicitly or question his every tweet. Blocker is leaving one life behind for another, does he want to bring his past life to his future. Hostiles attempts to deal with a very contentious issue and does a good job – on the white man’s side. Whilst the Native American has to just accept his place in the film and history on the chin. I wish the Cheyenne had more time to talk, to explore their position, instead they are just lead and protected by the army that’s trying now to do right by them. It reminded me lastly of Cheyenne Autumn (1964), the depiction of the Southern Cheyenne joining those in the North, which is more apologetic than Hostiles that draws it out of the characters slowly, not so much the director. I can only conclude that Revisionist Westerns will only be apologising with white actors in the lead role rather than the Native’s who depiction and capacity in the film is still being determined through the winners history.

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The Stalking Moon (1968) Revisited


The Stalking Moon (1968)A much-needed re-watch which has come a year after reading into The Stalking Moon (1968) compared to The Searchers (1956) (again) which I had to watch once more to see all the readings into the films depiction of the Native American for myself. It comes across as another possible narrative strand of The Searchers which really ends where Moon picks up. After a group of Apache are rounded up by the army, possibly having escaped a reservation or going to. Either way their freedom is over and future is determined. We discover a single white and blonde female captive Sarah Carver (Eva Marie Saint) who has been assimilated into their culture, she has assumed their language, dress and thinking.

For all intent and purposes she is a Native American, that is in the eyes of Ethan Edwards (John Wayne) who would more than likely left he to die or killed her himself. Not the army scout/Indian tracker Sam Varner (Gregory Peck) who readily accepts her as white or even just human and a woman (be that in 19th century terms). She is a free woman to do as she pleases, bringing her son with her, also that of Salvaje (Nathaniel Narcisco) which is Spanish for savage. If you know your Spanish you are already being given a pre-loaded conception of who this mostly un-seen figure is. Not unlike Scar (Henry Brandon) who we see a few times and interact with in the earlier film. The Spanish translation is cicatriz as the Mexican in the cantina tells Edwards.

I can’t really compare Varner and Edwards both are very different characters and that’s not the point of this re-exmination of the film. For me it’s about how the later film has been influenced, taking the same iconography and the depiction of the Native American. You could say they are one and the same film in some respects. A woman’s rescued from a life with the “Indians” which is either looked down on, mocked or pitied. In the genre you are better of dead than alive being a squaw. In reality women and children were only taken as prisoners, used as leverage with the army to stay on their land. Most of not all were later released, you can see where the myth begins though which has allowed the on-screen image to become bigger and more exotic. Being captured and living as one of a number of squaws with a one of the warriors or even chief, having a number of children, usually after being raped. Not a pretty picture but one that both dime novels and Hollywood and built up and reinforced.

So with this image built up on paper and on-screen, the Native American all but quieted on reservations the myth of conquest’s being formed and reinforced by clichés which we see in both The Searchers and The Stalking Moon, they are always seen through the eyes of the white man, usually the tracker who has a vast knowledge of them, which the audience dripped fed. Edwards is delivered with hate and disgust, whereas Varner’s more about the survival skills which he uses against them in order to stay alive. There is no real hatred behind his eyes, he is even close friends with his younger partner in the army a mixed race Nick Tana (Robert Forster) who looks up to him as a father figure. We can see that the fight between his two heritage was won by his white side, which in turn makes is easier for us to engage with him.

Going back to the depiction of the key Native American, both come from over-used nations – Apache and Comanche- the very names are more exotic on the ear, and sound more frightening than others. Scar the Comanche chief has lines and shares screen-time with Edwards, neither like each other and you can really feel it as they have a fruitless trading session. Whereas Salvaje is not even seen until the finale which is more about tension. He’s treated as an animal who has to be stopped in his tracks. There’s no eye to eye scene until it’s too late to do anything about, Salvaje is very one-dimensional and his only one goal to rescue his son from the white people, more able to accept his mixed heritage but not his circumstances. For the majority of the film he is only seen in the form of the aftermath of the victims he leaves as he comes in search of his son. He is the Apache Ethan Edwards going all the way to find his son, except it’s not over the course of seven years, more like a week if that.

The cost of the deaths could’ve been avoided as its pointed out to Sarah who is eager to get moving back home, knowing she needs to keep moving to survive with her son. She’s taken into the care of Varner who takes it on himself to escort her so far before getting to her destination of Silverton, her home town. She and her son (Noland Clay) who’re treated as second class citizens, with restricted travel and casual racism.

I must touch on the ranches that feature in both films, The Edwards ranch where we begin in The Searchers and with the Jorgensens as Debbie (Natalie Wood) is safely returned by to white safety and civilization, restoring her you could say. That restoration happens far earlier for Sarah, discovered at the beginning The Stalking Moon and is later invited to stay, possibly live at Varner’s ranch where we see inside far longer than the establishing scenes of Ford’s film. We only see the beginning of the Comanche raid, we don’t see anyone, nature discovers them first. The ranch is barricaded, cutting to Scar who has already found a young Debbie in the family graveyard, which is where her white life ends and “Indian” life begins. Back to New Mexico where Varner’s ranch and battle ground for the finale of the later film takes place. The danger is brought back to the homestead which eventually end with Salvajes death restoring order. Sarah’s able to adjust to White mans life along with her son, much like Debbie Edwards before her.

As I have found they share a lot of the same themes and imagery, just reordering them within the same basic landscape of the American West. It’s the last real conventional Western retelling of the same plot before we enter the modern world where Native American’s are replaced with criminals and other low-life that replace the previous obstacle. We have lost the racist in Edwards for a more well adjusted figure in Varner who can easily live among others. I guess the only true comparison would and will always be Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) whose an urban outsider, to dangerous for mainstream society. I think I know which film I’ll be watching again soon.

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The Lone Ranger (2013)


The Lone Ranger (2013)As promised and after all the build up and discussion I made it to see the much talked about and dragged through the mud The Lone Ranger (2013) which was not as disappointing as the critics would have you believe. Its more the lame horse that they just want to fail, just because it’s a re-teaming if Johnny Depp and director Gore Verbinski who had worked together on the Pirates of the Caribbean series that should have ended after Curse of the Black Pearl (2003). Still that’s another story.

Onto The Lone Ranger which is a reboot of the oldest franchise in history, that began in 1933, and cleverly worked into this origin story as we see a young boy at a fair meet the old and still weird Tonto (Depp) tell him the story of the beginning of The Lone Ranger. This adds some real depth to the western tale that could easily be built on truth, part of a wild-west show at a fair. Able to engage the younger audience who may never have seen or even heard of The Lone Ranger.

The first act is fast paced, introducing all the characters as John Reid (Armie Hammer) is coming into a Texan town as a lawyer, priding himself on the backbone of the law, doing anything he can to enforce it. Not what you would call a soon to be masked outlaw type of the wild west. Also on the train is the villain of the piece Butch Cavendish (William Fichtner) in chains alongside Tonto on their way to trial. This is the set-up for the first of the big train fights, something that is not to be missed. You can see where all the majority of the overblown $250 Billion budget has gone, the trains and massive set pieces such as this. These are what the film should be remembered for.

Then what begins is an overly long origin of the Lone Ranger, with his annoying sidekick Tonto, the Comanche with no tribe. Depps portrayal as I have been concerned about since learning of his role. Depp gives an overblown Deppesque portrayal of a Native American. At times he does have words of wisdom for the “wrong brother” who has been chosen to fight for justice. The Robin hood of the west.

Set during after the civil war, when the rail-road was beginning to really take hold across the country, the backdrop for this film. There are a number of homages throughout the film, from Monument Valley again taking the place of Texas which was beautifully captured. It will never be able to compete however with the grandiose of John FordTo the Comanche raid that referenced the family massacre in Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). The film-makers have indeed done their homework, just not refined what you see, throwing it all in there, with few revisions.

It feels like forever before we start to see things come together to see justice being dealt to Cavendish’s gang who have caused more trouble than we first saw at the beginning. Once again we are on the rail-road, with a hint of Indiana Jones as they all fight for freedom, justice and the truth. There’s a lot to take in, plenty of laughs for all ages to enjoy. It’s far from being the disaster that the critics want it to be. Everything is thrown in there for good and bad measure. For a reboot, it feels too long, trying to say too much at once. I’m glad I’ve watched it, but wish they had recast the lead roles, or at least toned down the wackyness of Depp who as the side-kick has top-billing, a first in film, whilst a whiny and unsuitable Hammer as the Lone Ranger tries his best in a role that is just not for him. If and when (which I doubt) they make a sequel I would be happy to see John Reid recast, not sure by who, just not Hammer who is more a supporting player. Was it worth the wait? Yes and no, It’s another rare western on the big screen whilst It should have been trimmed to be a tighter and more exciting film. It did treat the Native American’s more sensitively than I expected (bar Tonto) who even when they meet their conclusion is more profound than I imagined for a Blockbuster. It may not make it’s money back just yet, the screening I went too wasn’t even 1/4 full on a summer night, eventually it may break even.


The Last Wagon (1956)


The Last Wagon (1956)Being lead to safety Comanche on the run from the law wouldn’t be the first idea when your wagon train has been massacred by Apaches. For the survivors of The Last Wagon (1956) they have little choice. Starting out as a divided group of young people who grow up over the course of their journey together and the film.

When Comanche Todd (Richard Widmark) is finally caught after what appears to be a murdering rampage of four brothers he is finally caught by the one with a badge on his chest, who treats his far less than any other man in his custody. They bump into a wagon train making its way to Tuscon. Before they even get there, the white Comanche whose treatment by Sheriff Bill Harper (George Mathews)  who would even spit in the face of his prisoner who he ties to a wheel, starving him. Even turning on the people in the train who want to do the Christian thing by him.

Things turn from bad to worse when an Apache raid leaves the camp devastated. Thank fully Comanche Todd is there to meet the kids who ran off for a dangerous dip in the water. He could leave them to fend for themselves but decides to travel with them in a lone wagon to the safety beyond the next canyon. Moving through a rich landscape in Sedona, Arizona. Danger is on the increase for the group as the make it for safety. Including two quarrelling half sisters, both of the same father, for Jolie Normand (Susan Kohner) a white girl she cannot understand the thinking of her half Navajo sister Valinda Normand (Stephanie Griffin), its takes a snake bit to shaker some sense into her when another native American puts his life at risk for her.

When they finally reach the Army the growing presence of Apache’s has grown more so overnight who are ready to pounce on them and the whites in the neighbouring town who have angered them all. Without the intervention of Comanche Todd the six travellers would never have made it to safety, and sadly he would never be put on trial which produces a quick and cliché ending that sees everyone live happily ever after.

A decent western, even if he didn’t have the brown make-up, just a buck-skin outfit to do the job. Doing his best to see these kids to safety, showing that there is more a stranger than meets the eye. That the enemy, the Native American goes through the same problems as white people, having different ways of dealing with injustice, which we all want really.

 


Martha (2012)



Made in response to The Searchers (1956), creating suspense from recreating the Edwards family home before the moment of the Comanche massacre.

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