Posts tagged “Saloon

Painting the Town…Update (8/7/17)


A really quick day with one aim, to gut out and remake the bay windows. Last weekend I just wasn’t happy with how it was looking, the butting of balsa, the curvature of the bays. It just looks poor really when I look at the rest of the model. A poor compromise.

So I came back to the studio today, tearing out the bays and making a start on the new pieces that would soon be going in their place. I knew as soon as I removed them it was the right thing to do, more angular and professional looking, in-keeping with the look of the model miniature.

Bay windows gutted ready for something more angular. #workinprogress #cardboard #balsa #modelminiature

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Before moving onto fit everything in place, the three pieces of cardboard that boxed in the windows and the gum tape to seal it off. Adding the detail was pretty straight forward with no real problems beyond getting the length of balsa right.

I’m hoping next time to get a tin of primer next time, getting a coat on the model, I’m not sure how many it will take as its a move for me.


Painting the Town… Update (3/7/17)


The detail is almost there now with this latest model miniature. Again I found working at this increased scale that the process was far easier, I spent just under 4 hours in the studio on Sunday and even less on the model, due to what I could really do pre-painting. I found the hardest part of the making process was the bay windows, due to the curvature of the bays I have placed a supporting piece behind before after a number of wasted pieces later I could fix the front piece that reached across the middle. Maybe next time I will have more breaks in the window. I could even look again the footage next time and amend that part of the model miniature. Even though it’s a small detail it matters to me to have a decent gesture to the set.

Moving onto the stairway which was far easier to pull together. The only downside is the rail at the top, doesn’t need flush to the wall, however its a minor detail, should I apply that thought process to the bay windows? Is the perfectionist in me coming out? The bigger the model is, the more open it is to be looked into, even though it functions in the dark.


Painting the Town… Update (25/6/17)


A day late but nonetheless I achieved a lot yesterday in the studio, I made my way through a lot of cardboard too. Starting with the ceiling which I have not done justice in the photos I have taken below. Using the same method of joining sheets of cardboard together with straps which too a while to achieve. I had to adjust each side before I was satisfied. I did also have to turn to gum-tape again to reinforce and streamline the sections.

Overall I am pleased with the larger ceiling that reached slightly further forward than the smaller model. Next up was the tables and bar which were pretty simple really. Scaling up the previous pieces from the first model. The bar has almost doubled in size, along with the weight of the model. That is before I make a start of the balsa detail which will add slightly more weight. I have accepted that the straps are now part of my models adding an aesthetic which is unique to my work. Its another side to these constructed pieces, like a cardboard patchwork quilt, complete with joins.


Painting the Town… Update (24/6/17)


The larger saloon is really taking shape today. Having picked up where I left off, the stairs, which had to be adjusted so it was at the right angle to marry up more with my drawn on lines. Before bringing that whole section together, the mid-step and the final three steps before the balcony.

I then moved onto the other side of the piece the window, I knew this was going to be more straight forward. Reworking the wall to suggest bay-windows and the doorway, which I think works better at this scale, a more narrow doorway which should be more representative of the original set.

I finished the day by using gum-tape to seal up the cracks and reinforce the joins so it will be more flush and stronger as a piece. It will also be easier to paint – which led me to consider using a domestic primer for the first few coats before the white acrylic to finish it off ready to project onto.